• Farming Community in Yavatmal came up with a Declaration to stop pesticide Menace on the World Soil Day and No Pesticide Use Week

    Press Release | PAN India | 6th December 2018 Farming Community in Yavatmal came up with a Declaration to stop pesticide menace on the World Soil Day and No Pesticide Use Week Sri. Dewanand Pawar, founding member of MAPPP, addressing the gathering 'Maharashtra Association of Pesticide Poisoned Persons' formed on the World Soil Day  and No Pesticide Use Week in Yavatmal in the Farmers Meeting on "Impact of Pesticides on Soil and Children of the Soil” On 5th December, 2018, commemorating World Soil Day, amidst observing ‘No Pesticide Use Week (3-10 December, 2018), scores of farmers came together from different Districts of Maharashtra to deliberate on pesticide poisoning. Pesticide poisoning, in addition to debts, low harvest prices, climate change impacts, under quality seeds, has been adding burden on farmers in Vidarbha region. Farmers resolved to form Maharashtra Association of Pesticide Poisoned Persons. They plan to capacitate this organisation to fight for their rights. MAPPP, they feel, can effectively lobby for compensation to families, which witnessed deaths or debilitation due to pesticide poisoning, while spraying on cotton and other crops. Because of pesticide poisoning, families of farmers and farm workers are losing their breadwinners to death and disease. A Yavatmal Declaration has been released. Smt. Vidyatai Dhote, a organic farmer and a social worker, said, pesticides are a burden for the farmers. Ms. Mani Prakash, a advocate, wanted farmers to talk to the women in their families and understand the impacts on their bodies and work. Sri. Vasant Rathod , a cancer survivor, squarely blames insecticides for his cancer and exhorts farmers to move away from them. Pesticide poisoning has become a major factor in increasing poverty in rural areas of Maharashtra, more particularly in Vidarbha region. Dr. Narasimha Reddy Donthi, a policy expert, observed that ‘while the balance sheets of major pesticide companies are showing huge profits, farmers are ending up in debts’. Sri. Dewanand Pawar, Convenor of MAPPP, has a clear road map to bring companies to take responsibility, and has expectations on government to play a huge role in making liability part of Indian pesticide regulation. Sri. C. Jayakumar, Director, PAN India, brings his experience in international treaty negotiations to this august gathering of farmers. He wanted them to go beyond and increase focus on achieving agroecology. He said, ‘prevention of pesticide usage is the sustainable solution, and pursuing agroecological methods of production will free farmers from exploitative agrochemical, trade and seed business companies’. Sri. A. D. Dileep Kumar, PAN India, presented a study done by them on the victims of pesticide poisoning, and reported that about 31% of victims they surveyed are still unable to do work as they used to do before the poisoning incident. Earlier, PAN India did a fact-finding mission in 2017 and has produced a now widely popular report. These studies show some shocking results of ignorance, apathy and failure. This report can be found HERE. This gathering has been facilitated primarily by Pesticide Action Network (PAN) India, in partnership with Shetkari Nyayhakk Andolan, Yavatmal, Pesticide Action Network (PAN) Asia Pacific and other organisations. Recent Posts Farming Community in Yavatmal came up with a Declaration to stop pesticide Menace on the World Soil Day and No Pesticide Use Week Draft Pesticide Management Bill-2017 not comprehensive enough to address issues on pesticides in India END CORPORATE GREED! RIGHTS NOW! Untold Realities of Pesticide Poisonings in Yavatmal District in Maharashtra Chemical leak in Delhi – PAN India urge to establish pesticide free buffer zones around schools TagsAgroecology AnupamVarma Commitee Report Banned Pesticides BAN Pesticides BRS COPs 2017 Climate Change Corporate Accountability Corporate Libility Delhi gas leack Draft Banning of Pesticides Order 2016 Fact Finding Mission Food Sovereignty Glyphosate Herbicide HHP HHPs Indian Tea India Pesticide Ban India Pesticide Risk Inhalational Poisonings Maharashtra Association of Pesticide Poisonned Persons No pesticide Use Day Paraquat Paraquat Retailing India Paraquat Use is India Pesticide Management Bill-2017 Pesticide Poisoning in Yavatmal Pesticide Regulation Phasing out HHPs Plantation Pesticide PMB-2017 Roundup Tea Plantations UN HRC Special Rapporteur on the right to food World Soil Day Yavatmal Declaration Yavatmal poisoning


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  • Chemical leak in Delhi – PAN India urge to establish pesticide free buffer zones around schools

    Chemical leak in Delhi - PAN India urge to establish pesticide free buffer zones around schools Press Release | 10th May, 2017 Toxic chemical leak in Delhi had left children breathless and in agony Chemical leak near two schools in New Delhi reminds us of the urgent need to create chemical-free buffer zones around education institutions. This chemical leak incident that happened very close to two schools in the Tughlakabad area in Delhi, in the morning of 6th May 2017, had left children breathless and in agony. According to reports, school going children inhaled a toxic chemical 2-Chloro-5-chloromethylpyridine, leaking from a truck parked in a container depot located near two schools in southeast Delhi’s Tughlaqabad area. More than 400 girls were immediately impacted and were hospitalised. Students of Government Girls Senior Secondary School (GGSSS) and  Rani Jhansi School were taken to nearby hospitals as they complained of severe eye irritation and breathlessness. According to news reports, students complained of vomiting, coughing, and feeling uneasy and eye irritation.   School students under treatment in a hospital, Delhi. Source: PTI Photo As reported, at least 487 school students and teachers and residents of a colony in Tughlaqabad fell sick on Saturday after inhaling fumes emanating from a liquid (2-Chloro-5-chloromethylpyridine). The National Disaster Response Force had reported that the truck contained 80 cans of  2-Chloro-5-chloromethylpyridine. The truck was parked in the Tughlaqabad depot waiting customs clearance. Reports say the chemical container was imported from China and was to be taken to Sonepat in Haryana. Chemical leaked in Delhi is used for manufacture of insecticides and pesticides 2-Chloro-5-chloromethylpyridine is used in the production of an insecticide imidacloroprid, which has been found to be extremely toxic to non-target insects and bees. According to Pubchem, an open chemistry database of US National Library of Medicine, 2-Chloro-5-chloromethylpyridine is a dangerous chemical having the potential to cause severe skin burns and eye damage. Apparently, some quick action from school authorities, and NDRF, has contained the situation, and has saved children from serious impacts. However, medical parameters of the affected children need to be monitored for a longer period, to rule out chronic impacts. Incidentally, this happened in the heart of the Indian capital. One can only imagine what if the same leak happened near rural schools, or locations, which are far away from hospitals and rapid action teams. Is India ready to protect its children from chemical accidents, incidents and neglect of safety by the transporters, storage operators and chemical or pesticide users? India did not learn much from the Bhopal disaster in 1984. Apart from the discussion whether the Delhi gas leak is a unfortunate incident or an accident, school going children are exposed to similar hazards on a daily basis in most rural areas across India, as pesticide sprays, often more dangerous than 2-Chloro-5-chloromethylpyridine. Children in schools located near agricultural fields, and plantations, inhale drift from pesticide sprays. Scientific research has established long back that children whose breath is faster than adults are likely to be impacted more severely. Children impacted by toxic chemicals is an indication of negligence and failure of regulatory regime Pesticide Action Network (PAN) India director C. Jayakumar said, “it is so sad that children had become victims of hazardous substances which are inputs in the manufacture of agrochemicals. Even after several incidents right from the Bhopal gas tragedy, our authorities have not  realized the seriousness of the problem and are not taking measures to keep away hazardous chemicals from the vicinity of even education institutions in view of  public health and safety”. Adding further, he said, “in India, we have successfully established tobacco and alcohol free zones around schools but failed to bring in such restrictions for more dangerous substances such as chemicals and pesticides.” Pesticides free buffer zones around education institutions needed Dr. Narasimha Reddy Donthi of PAN India pointed to the urgent need of establishing buffer-zones of at least a kilometre around education institutions and child care centres. Hazardous chemicals, pesticides and or raw materials used to produce such dangerous chemicals should not be stored, manufactured or used in any form near this safe zone. Dileep Kumar A. D., Programme Coordinator of PAN India, said “carelessness of manufacturers, importers, transporters and users of hazardous chemicals and pesticides, and inaction of concerned authorities today compromises the safety of children. The future of nation is in the hands of children and therefore they should get a toxic free life and poison free environment to grow”. PAN India urges the Central and State Governments to come up with stringent measures to keep away hazardous chemicals and pesticides from the vicinity of education institutions, to ensure safety of children. Considering public health and safety, authorities must come up with policies towards the establishment of pesticide-free buffer zones at least around schools while efforts should be taken to phase out production and use of agrochemicals. Take action - Support call for pesticide free buffer zones around schools Learn more about Protect Our Children from Toxic Pesticides campaign               Protect Our Children From Toxic Pesticides Support our call for pesticide-free buffer zones around schools.               Recent Posts Farming Community in Yavatmal came up with a Declaration to stop pesticide Menace on the World Soil Day and No Pesticide Use Week Draft Pesticide Management Bill-2017 not comprehensive enough to address issues on pesticides in India END CORPORATE GREED! RIGHTS NOW! Untold Realities of Pesticide Poisonings in Yavatmal District in Maharashtra Chemical leak in Delhi – PAN India urge to establish pesticide free buffer zones around schools TagsAgroecology AnupamVarma Commitee Report Banned Pesticides BAN Pesticides BRS COPs 2017 Climate Change Corporate Accountability Corporate Libility Delhi gas leack Draft Banning of Pesticides Order 2016 Fact Finding Mission Food Sovereignty Glyphosate Herbicide HHP HHPs Indian Tea India Pesticide Ban India Pesticide Risk Inhalational Poisonings Maharashtra Association of Pesticide Poisonned Persons No pesticide Use Day Paraquat Paraquat Retailing India Paraquat Use is India Pesticide Management Bill-2017 Pesticide Poisoning in Yavatmal Pesticide Regulation Phasing out HHPs Plantation Pesticide PMB-2017 Roundup Tea Plantations UN HRC Special Rapporteur on the right to food World Soil Day Yavatmal Declaration Yavatmal poisoning


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  • PAN International Press Release in Advance of the Conferences of the Parties to the 2017 Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions

    PESTICIDES DON'T RESPECT NATIONAL BORDERS 21th April 2017 | PAN International PAN International Press Release in Advance of the Conferences of the Parties to the 2017 Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions Pesticide Action Network International (PAN International) looks forward to the meetings of the Conferences of the Parties to the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm conventions from April 24 to May 5, 2017 in Geneva, Switzerland. We urge the Parties to agree to the listing of the recommended hazardous pesticides and chemicals and to find mechanisms to ensure effective functioning of these treaties. As part of the preparation for these combined Conferences of Parties, PAN International is providing an updated list of pesticide bans around the world, with verified information from 106 countries. We are releasing the 3rd edition of the Consolidated List of Bans, which shows that 370 pesticide active ingredients are banned in one or more countries. The updated list includes 49 new pesticides and 4 new countries. We urge the Parties to promote agroecology as the preferred and viable alternative to the use of highly hazardous pesticides in agricultural production. Agroecological approaches to farming not only help farmers thrive in their agricultural production but also bring multiple social, health, environmental and economic benefits to the communities where agroecology is practiced. PAN International asks Parties to these treaties to focus their attention on better compliance and decision making procedures in the Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions, ensuring that the most hazardous chemicals are addressed in ways that protect human health and the environment worldwide. Due to ineffective treaty procedures, such as those in the Rotterdam Convention requiring consensus rather than implementing the will of the majority of Parties to list chemicals, a very few countries have been able to prevent progress being made towards achieving protections from hazardous chemicals for communities around the world. In the Rotterdam Convention Conference of Parties, several countries have twice prevented the listing of a formulation of the highly hazardous pesticide paraquat because they want to continue to export this pesticide without being required to alert the importing country governments and giving them the opportunity to deny its entry into their country. Paraquat, an herbicide with high acute toxicity, is widely banned around the world as it causes many occupational and non- occupational deaths every year. “Listing of a chemical under the Rotterdam Convention is not a ban, it just gives countries the ability to make informed choices. We hope that the Rotterdam Convention Conference of Parties will agree to the African proposal to amend the Convention to allow voting rather than requiring a consensus-based decision making process for the listing of chemicals, so that the vast majority are not blocked by a few” said Dr. Meriel Watts, senior science advisor for PAN Asia Pacific. PAN International also urges the Stockholm Convention Conference of Parties to arrive at an enforceable compliance mechanism to hold accountable the Parties who are disregarding the provisions of the Convention. For example, Brazil, the only country to have registered its use of the ant bait poison sulfluramid, which breaks down into the listed persistent organic pollutant PFOS, is exporting it to other Latin American countries, where it is not registered and who are using it for purposes banned under the Stockholm Convention. This is a blatant disregard for the decision of the Convention regarding sulfluramid. “It is necessary for countries to reach an agreement to list hazardous chemicals like sulfluramid in the treaty. However, there have to be robust mechanisms to ensure that Parties fully comply with the decisions taken as part of the treaty process. Right now, Brazil is not fully complying with the decision regarding sulfluramid taken under the Stockholm Convention. This needs to be addressed urgently, and overall compliance mechanisms strengthened for the Convention” said Javier Souza Casadinho, regional coordinator of PAN Latin America, RAPAL. We also urge the Parties of the Stockholm Convention to renew their commitment to the ban on the use DDT for malaria control and minimize acceptance of requests from countries for exemptions from this ban. There are very effective Integrated Vector Management approaches, not relying on the use of DDT, that have been proven to work well in African, Latin American and Asian contexts to control malaria. “Indoor Residual Spraying with DDT is not successful in the long-term for malaria vector control. Community level work on the ground in various African countries has shown that Integrated Vector Management can achieve successful malaria control. We call on the Stockholm Convention to not approve further exemptions from the DDT ban for malaria control” said Dr. Abou Thiam, executive director of PAN Africa. Failing to protect communities from highly hazardous pesticides and other dangerous chemicals is a violation of their human right to health. PAN International urges the global community to help minimize contamination of the environment by highly hazardous pesticides and their impacts on human health. These pesticides must be replaced by least toxic pest and vector management approaches that are effective in the long term.   Available for interview: Dr. Meriel Watts +64-21-1807830; meriel@merielwatts.net     Recent Posts Farming Community in Yavatmal came up with a Declaration to stop pesticide Menace on the World Soil Day and No Pesticide Use Week December 7, 2018 Draft Pesticide Management Bill-2017 not comprehensive enough to address issues on pesticides in India March 15, 2018 END CORPORATE GREED! RIGHTS NOW! December 3, 2017 Untold Realities of Pesticide Poisonings in Yavatmal District in Maharashtra October 28, 2017 Chemical leak in Delhi – PAN India urge to establish pesticide free buffer zones around schools May 11, 2017 TagsAgroecology AnupamVarma Commitee Report Banned Pesticides BAN Pesticides BRS COPs 2017 Climate Change Corporate Accountability Corporate Libility Delhi gas leack Draft Banning of Pesticides Order 2016 Fact Finding Mission Food Sovereignty Glyphosate Herbicide HHP HHPs Indian Tea India Pesticide Ban India Pesticide Risk Inhalational Poisonings Maharashtra Association of Pesticide Poisonned Persons No pesticide Use Day Paraquat Paraquat Retailing India Paraquat Use is India Pesticide Management Bill-2017 Pesticide Poisoning in Yavatmal Pesticide Regulation Phasing out HHPs Plantation Pesticide PMB-2017 Roundup Tea Plantations UN HRC Special Rapporteur on the right to food World Soil Day Yavatmal Declaration Yavatmal poisoning


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  • International Network Welcomes UN Special Rapporteur’s Call for Global Regulation of Pesticides

    International Network Welcomes UN Special Rapporteur’s Call for Global Regulation of Pesticides Press Release |7th March 2017 Geneva, Switzerland - Pesticide Action Network (PAN) International welcomes the release today of the report on the use of agricultural pesticides by the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the right to food. Special Rapporteur Hilal Elver today presented her report to the 34th session of the United National Human Rights Council. She noted the ongoing impacts of pesticides on people, the environment and human rights and the failure to hold the pesticide industry accountable for these effects and recommended that: The international community must work on a comprehensive, binding treaty to regulate hazardous pesticides throughout their life cycle, taking into account human rights principles. PAN unreservedly supports this recommendation and urges the international community to swiftly begin the process of negotiating a treaty. Such a mandatory treaty will generate policies to reduce pesticide use worldwide and develop a framework for the banning and phasing-out of highly hazardous pesticides and promoting agroecology. In 2015, the Strategic Approach to International Chemicals Management (SAICM), an international policy framework to promote chemical safety around the world, finally recognized highly hazardous pesticides as an ‘issue of concern’. SAICM recommended replacement of pesticides with sustainable, low toxic approaches to agriculture, such as agroecologically-based practices. The only global mechanism looking at comprehensive management of chemicals, SAICM is set to end by 2020 without having achieved any significant reductions in pesticide poisonings. The time is right for putting into practice the recommendation by the Special Rapporteur for a binding treaty to regulate hazardous pesticides throughout their life cycle. Sarojeni Rengam, Executive Director of PAN Asia Pacific strongly supports the idea of a new binding treaty and said “SAICM ends in 2020. The need for a binding international treaty for management of pesticides is becoming very clear and is an urgent need for moving forward the work started through SAICM. This is critically needed to protect the human right to food and also to protect vulnerable populations like children, farm workers and others from the harmful impacts of pesticides used in conventional agriculture in much of the world”. Javier Souza Coordinator of RAPAL, PAN Latin America, said “the human right to food implies not only access to food but also an adequate quality of that food. The intensive use of pesticides and fertilizers together with the use of genetically modified seeds results in a loss of food quality. PAN International demands that at the global level binding mechanisms are set up that promote agroecological methods of food production for generating sustainable, viable and resilient agroecosystems.” PAN International has worked extensively on the issue of Highly Hazardous Pesticides or HHPs in agriculture and released a new version of a list of such HHPs in December 2016. Susan Haffmans from PAN Germany said “Highly Hazardous Pesticides are a big contributor to health and environmental harms around the globe. There is no “safe use” of hazardous pesticides. For the sake of future generations the international community should act now and agree on a binding treaty to regulate and ultimately phase out hazardous pesticides and to promote agroecological alternatives. Having seen first-hand the successes of agroecology in promoting good health and a safe environment Abou Thiam, Director of PAN Africa added that “Agriculture around the world can no longer be dependent on a resource intensive, environmentally destructive paradigm that harms communities and produces lower quality food. Binding international mechanisms promoting agroecology have to be set up that protect human health and the environment and increase farm output, biodiversity and resilience.” PAN UK has worked extensively to promote agroecological practices in a number of key crops in Africa and Latin America. Keith Tyrell, Director of PAN UK said “Today there are no excuses for continuing business- as-usual when it comes to agriculture. Food and fiber are being grown successfully without the use of HHPs around the world. The Special Rapporteur’s report unmasks the forces that try to make resource intensive agriculture look like the acceptable norm. We must push forward the right to food that is cultivated safely and sustainably.” Judy Hatcher, Executive Director of PAN North America summed up by saying “The UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food highlighted the corporate control over the agricultural system around much of the globe. This corporate capture of the food system has resulted in devastation for communities around the world and led to artificial scarcity and poor quality foods. It is time to right this wrong and get a robust international mechanism in place that will truly protect our human right to food.” Pesticide Action Network, an international network with regional centers on five continents, has been working for over 35 years to bring attention to the problem of pesticide poisoning, and to spur international action to address the problem. The Special Rapporteur’s report is available at: http://www.ohchr.org/EN/Issues/Food/Pages/Annual.aspx Available for interview: Abou Thiam, PAN Africa, abouthiam@pan-afrique.org, +223 64898163 Sarojeni Rengam, PAN Asia Pacific, sarojeni.rengam@panap.net Susan Haffmans, PAN Germany, susan.haffmans@pan-germany.org , +49(0)40-3991910-25 Javier Souza Casadinho, PAN Latin America, javierrapal@yahoo.com.ar ,+11 15 3617 1782 Paul Towers, PAN North America, ptowers@panna.org , +10119165883100 Keith Tyrell, PAN United Kingdom, keithtyrell@pan-uk.org , +447588706224           Recent Posts Farming Community in Yavatmal came up with a Declaration to stop pesticide Menace on the World Soil Day and No Pesticide Use Week December 7, 2018 Draft Pesticide Management Bill-2017 not comprehensive enough to address issues on pesticides in India March 15, 2018 END CORPORATE GREED! RIGHTS NOW! December 3, 2017 Untold Realities of Pesticide Poisonings in Yavatmal District in Maharashtra October 28, 2017 Chemical leak in Delhi – PAN India urge to establish pesticide free buffer zones around schools May 11, 2017 TagsAgroecology AnupamVarma Commitee Report Banned Pesticides BAN Pesticides BRS COPs 2017 Climate Change Corporate Accountability Corporate Libility Delhi gas leack Draft Banning of Pesticides Order 2016 Fact Finding Mission Food Sovereignty Glyphosate Herbicide HHP HHPs Indian Tea India Pesticide Ban India Pesticide Risk Inhalational Poisonings Maharashtra Association of Pesticide Poisonned Persons No pesticide Use Day Paraquat Paraquat Retailing India Paraquat Use is India Pesticide Management Bill-2017 Pesticide Poisoning in Yavatmal Pesticide Regulation Phasing out HHPs Plantation Pesticide PMB-2017 Roundup Tea Plantations UN HRC Special Rapporteur on the right to food World Soil Day Yavatmal Declaration Yavatmal poisoning


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  • Workshop on Climate Crisis and Food Sovereignty for Rural Women

    Workshop on Climate Crisis and Food Sovereignty for Rural Women Press Release | 14th October 2016 An awareness creation workshop on 'Food security and the Changing Climate' as part of the 16 days of global action on Land & Resources - Defend food sovereignty! Strengthen community resilience amid climate crisis! for rural women in Meenangadi Panchayat on October 14th. The campaign ‘16 days of global action on land and resources’ was started on first October and will be culminated on October 16th, at the International Monsanto Tribunal , to be organised in Hague, Netherlands. The workshop in Meenangadi was organised jointly by Meenangadi Grama Panchayat, Thanal, Save our Rice Campaign, Pesticide Action Network (PAN) Asia & the Pacific and PAN India at the S. A. Majeed Memorial Hall in the Panchayat. The sessions were focused on building awareness on various issues in farming and food security in the Panchayat amidst the climate crisis. Farming and Food Sovereignty, Ecological Agriculture, Biodiversity and food security, Farming and water resources, Changes in food habit over the past decades, corporate control on farming, etc. were the topics addressed during the group discussion. Followed by the discussion, each group presented their   views and concerns. The participants raised the urgent need for empowering rural women to overcome the grass root impacts caused by climate change and related issues. Nearly 100 Kudumbasree members attended the program. Climate change has become one of the most severe and pertinent crisis that threatens our food security. Intense and irregular rainfall, droughts, increasing temperature, long summer periods, shortage of rain and other climate-related stresses have the most serious impacts on agriculture and have impacted small food producers’ access to land, water and other resources. What makes it worse is that the small food producers who are the most vulnerable to the impact of climate change are the least responsible for causing it. Climate change has a particularly severe impact on rural women who suffer more in the wake of droughts, floods, etc and eventually crop losses, food and water shortages and loss of lands, homes and livelihoods. The workshop was   inaugurated by Sri. C. Asainar, Vice President of Meenangadi Grama Panchayat. Sri. V Suresh (Chairman, Welfare Standing Committee, Meenangadi Grama Panchayat) presided over the program. Sri Leneesh (Programme Officer, Thanal & State Coordinator of Save our Rice Campaign) and Sri Dileep Kumar A D (Programme Coordinator, Pesticide Action Network India) led the sessions and group discussion.     Recent Posts Farming Community in Yavatmal came up with a Declaration to stop pesticide Menace on the World Soil Day and No Pesticide Use Week December 7, 2018 Draft Pesticide Management Bill-2017 not comprehensive enough to address issues on pesticides in India March 15, 2018 END CORPORATE GREED! RIGHTS NOW! December 3, 2017 Untold Realities of Pesticide Poisonings in Yavatmal District in Maharashtra October 28, 2017 Chemical leak in Delhi – PAN India urge to establish pesticide free buffer zones around schools May 11, 2017 TagsAgroecology AnupamVarma Commitee Report Banned Pesticides BAN Pesticides BRS COPs 2017 Climate Change Corporate Accountability Corporate Libility Delhi gas leack Draft Banning of Pesticides Order 2016 Fact Finding Mission Food Sovereignty Glyphosate Herbicide HHP HHPs Indian Tea India Pesticide Ban India Pesticide Risk Inhalational Poisonings Maharashtra Association of Pesticide Poisonned Persons No pesticide Use Day Paraquat Paraquat Retailing India Paraquat Use is India Pesticide Management Bill-2017 Pesticide Poisoning in Yavatmal Pesticide Regulation Phasing out HHPs Plantation Pesticide PMB-2017 Roundup Tea Plantations UN HRC Special Rapporteur on the right to food World Soil Day Yavatmal Declaration Yavatmal poisoning


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  • Ecological Agriculture is a political activity to ensure safe food for all

    Ecological Agriculture is a political activity to ensure safe food for all Press Release| PAN India Releasing the book, “Replacing chemicals with Biology: Phasing out highly hazardous pesticides with agroecology” at the Kerala Agriculture university campus Vellayani, Thiruvanathapuram, Dr. T M Thomas Isaac M. L. A. (former finance Minister, Kerala) said that the book would certainly be a great encouragement to the organic farming activities happening in Kerala and would strengthen the organic farming movements. He stressed that we need to realize the long term impacts pesticides and agrochemicals, and also industrialization of the agriculture sector. Also he pointed out the impact of modern agriculture with the example of sub Saharan Africa, quoting the book, “Seeds of Famine’. The agribusiness is only looking at its profit, not concerned on the long term impact of chemicalising agriculture. The economics of modern agribusiness is aimed at generating more and more profits, not on developing sustainable agriculture and ensuring safe food. There is a vested interest on the unsustainable agriculture by the modern agribusiness and is aimed at accumulating their profit by controlling agriculture input market. Dr. Isaac pointed it is a kind of developing a thrown away culture, through advertisements and other practices, and as part of the economy these inherent rules and practices  are largely becoming into a waste economy. And because of this, organic farming is gaining importance as a political activity. Here, everybody can participate in this political activity, not only farmers, but also for those who do not even have land to cultivate. Those who do not have enough land can also do organic farming in grow bags and also do terrace farming. Each and everyone can participate in this activity by managing and recycling household biodegradable waste, making it into manure through composting and do organic farming with the same manure. In addition, organic is also important in mitigating climate change.   Thus organic farming is a political activity to ensure fresh vegetables, safe food, recycling biodegradable waste and also a resistance against the monopolisation of agriculture and agribusiness. He encouraged the students in the KAU campus to adopt a ward in Trivandrum and support the residents in doing composting and organic farming and  to develop it into a model of ultimate green solution. The book release function was jointly organized by PAN India along with Thanal and Students Union in Kerala Agriculture University  at the Vellayani Campus, Trivandrum on 7th October. This PAN International publication was originally released at the fourth session of International Conference on Chemical Management (ICCM4).   Recent Posts Farming Community in Yavatmal came up with a Declaration to stop pesticide Menace on the World Soil Day and No Pesticide Use Week December 7, 2018 Draft Pesticide Management Bill-2017 not comprehensive enough to address issues on pesticides in India March 15, 2018 END CORPORATE GREED! RIGHTS NOW! December 3, 2017 Untold Realities of Pesticide Poisonings in Yavatmal District in Maharashtra October 28, 2017 Chemical leak in Delhi – PAN India urge to establish pesticide free buffer zones around schools May 11, 2017 TagsAgroecology AnupamVarma Commitee Report Banned Pesticides BAN Pesticides BRS COPs 2017 Climate Change Corporate Accountability Corporate Libility Delhi gas leack Draft Banning of Pesticides Order 2016 Fact Finding Mission Food Sovereignty Glyphosate Herbicide HHP HHPs Indian Tea India Pesticide Ban India Pesticide Risk Inhalational Poisonings Maharashtra Association of Pesticide Poisonned Persons No pesticide Use Day Paraquat Paraquat Retailing India Paraquat Use is India Pesticide Management Bill-2017 Pesticide Poisoning in Yavatmal Pesticide Regulation Phasing out HHPs Plantation Pesticide PMB-2017 Roundup Tea Plantations UN HRC Special Rapporteur on the right to food World Soil Day Yavatmal Declaration Yavatmal poisoning


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  • Book release: “Replacing Chemicals with Biology: Phasing out highly hazardous pesticides with agroecology”

    Book release: “Replacing Chemicals with Biology: Phasing out highly hazardous pesticides with agroecology” Press Release by PAN India, Thanal and KAU Students Union PAN India along with Thanal and KAU Students Union organizing an event at Kerala Aggriculture University Vellayani Campus, Trivandrum on 7th October at 1pm to release the new book on agroecology “Replacing Chemicals with Biology: Phasing out highly hazardous pesticides with agroecology”, published by Pesticide Action Network (PAN) International. The book would be released by Dr. T. M. Thomas Isaac  MLA (former financial minister, Kerala), and the first copy would be received by Mr. Ajmal, General Secretary, Students Union, Kerala Agriculture University, Vellayani, Thiruvanathapuram. This book was originally launched on 29th September at the 4th International Conference on Chemicals Management (ICCM4) held in Geneva during 28th September and 2nd October 2015.  The resolution acknowledges that HHPs causes severe adverse effects on human health and the environment.  The ICCM4 has recognized highly hazardous pesticides (HHPs) as an "issue of concern." The conference in its resolution, supported concerted action to address HHPs and welcomed a strategy to address them that has been developed by UNEP, FAO and WHO. Significantly, the ICCM4 placed emphasis on the need to promote agroecological alternatives instead of replacing them with another chemical pesticide. FAO Director-General, José Graziano da Silva, said in Paris in February this year "The model of agricultural production that predominates today is not suitable for the new food security challenges of the 21st century. Since food production is not a sufficient condition for food security, it means that the way we are producing is no longer acceptable." "Modern agroecological approaches to food production, together with many of the ecological practices that have evolved with farmers working alongside nature through hundreds of years, are proving to be sustainable, economically advantageous and good for food security" says Dr Meriel Watts from PAN Asia Pacific and main author of the book. Successful cases of agroecological farming in Asia, Africa, Latin America, Europe and USA, presented in the book, substantiating the long-standing claim that ecological principles applied to agriculture are effective tools in the management of pests, including weeds, and provide sustainable livelihoods to farmers and rural communities. "There is world recognition that agricultural production cannot continue its business as usual. Agroecology offers a viable strategy to increase agricultural productivity, build farmers' resilience, and protect the environment," says Sarojeni Rengam, executive director of PAN Asia Pacific. "The experiences in this book show how farmers using agroecological practices benefit from savings on agrochemical inputs and from improving their overall farm productivity. Getting better prices or market options for safer food helps farming households too" says Dr Stephanie Williamson, from PAN UK, and co-author of the book. The case studies show that agroecological farming can improve food security and strengthen food sovereignty, while providing better adaptation to climate change and reducing harmful environmental impacts. "Advancing equitable and sustainable development goals in agriculture requires grounding agrifood systems in agroecology as the central strategy," says Dr. Marcia Ishii-Eiteman, Senior Scientist at PAN North America, and one of the contributors to the book. "By integrating state-of-the-art science with local and traditional knowledge, agroecology offers a powerful solution to today's mounting social, economic and environmental stresses of climate change, water scarcity, land degradation and rural poverty." Agroecological practices can increase farm productivity and food security, improves rural livelihoods and adaption to climate change, and reduces the environmental impacts of agriculture. The new PAN book was written to address the concerns of policy makers around the world who are faced with the need to replace the use of highly hazardous pesticides (HHPs) with safer and sustainable alternatives. The book presents national and international policy recommendations designed to help implement the changes necessary to support widespread adoption of agroecology. This book is also to assist governments and policy makers to initiate a collective action to reduce the human impacts of highly hazardous pesticides (HHPs) and come out with a clear timeline for the global phase-out of HHPs, and to replace the hazardous pesticides with the sound science of agroecology for sustaining agriculture. Download the book here     Recent Posts Farming Community in Yavatmal came up with a Declaration to stop pesticide Menace on the World Soil Day and No Pesticide Use Week December 7, 2018 Draft Pesticide Management Bill-2017 not comprehensive enough to address issues on pesticides in India March 15, 2018 END CORPORATE GREED! RIGHTS NOW! December 3, 2017 Untold Realities of Pesticide Poisonings in Yavatmal District in Maharashtra October 28, 2017 Chemical leak in Delhi – PAN India urge to establish pesticide free buffer zones around schools May 11, 2017 TagsAgroecology AnupamVarma Commitee Report Banned Pesticides BAN Pesticides BRS COPs 2017 Climate Change Corporate Accountability Corporate Libility Delhi gas leack Draft Banning of Pesticides Order 2016 Fact Finding Mission Food Sovereignty Glyphosate Herbicide HHP HHPs Indian Tea India Pesticide Ban India Pesticide Risk Inhalational Poisonings Maharashtra Association of Pesticide Poisonned Persons No pesticide Use Day Paraquat Paraquat Retailing India Paraquat Use is India Pesticide Management Bill-2017 Pesticide Poisoning in Yavatmal Pesticide Regulation Phasing out HHPs Plantation Pesticide PMB-2017 Roundup Tea Plantations UN HRC Special Rapporteur on the right to food World Soil Day Yavatmal Declaration Yavatmal poisoning


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  • Phasing out highly hazardous pesticides with agroecology: Pesticide Action Network releases book at ICCM4

    Phasing out highly hazardous pesticides with agroecology: Pesticide Action Network releases book at ICCM4 Press Release by PAN International | 29th September 2016 Agroecological practices can increase farm productivity and food security, improve rural livelihoods and adaption to climate change, and reduce the environmental impacts of agriculture. At the 4th International Conference on Chemicals Management (ICCM4) in Geneva, Pesticide Action Network (PAN) International is releasing its book Replacing Chemicals with Biology: Phasing out highly hazardous pesticides with agroecology. click to download FAO Director-General, José Graziano da Silva, said in Paris in February this year "The model of agricultural production that predominates today is not suitable for the new food security challenges of the 21st century… Since food production is not a sufficient condition for food security, it means that the way we are producing is no longer acceptable." The new PAN book was written to address the concerns of policy makers around the world who are faced with the need to replace the use of highly hazardous pesticides (HHPs) with safer and sustainable alternatives. "Modern agroecological approaches to food production, together with many of the ecological practices that have evolved with farmers working alongside nature through hundreds of years, are proving to be sustainable, economically advantageous and good for food security" says Dr Meriel Watts from PAN Asia Pacific and main author of the book. Successful cases of agroecological farming in Asia, Africa, Latin America, Europe and USA, presented in the book, substantiating the long-standing claim that ecological principles applied to agriculture are effective tools in the management of pests, including weeds, and provide sustainable livelihoods to farmers and rural communities. "There is world recognition that agricultural production cannot continue its business as usual. Agroecology offers a viable strategy to increase agricultural productivity, build farmers' resilience, and protect the environment," says Sarojeni Rengam, executive director of PAN Asia Pacific. "The experiences in this book show how farmers using agroecological practices benefit from savings on agrochemical inputs and from improving their overall farm productivity. Getting better prices or market options for safer food helps farming households too" says Dr Stephanie Williamson, from PAN UK, and co-author of the book. The case studies show that agroecological farming can improve food security and strengthen food sovereignty, while providing better adaptation to climate change and reducing harmful environmental impacts. "Advancing equitable and sustainable development goals in agriculture requires grounding agrifood systems in agroecology as the central strategy," says Dr. Marcia Ishii-Eiteman, Senior Scientist at PAN North America, and one of the contributors to the book. "By integrating state-of-the-art science with local and traditional knowledge, agroecology offers a powerful solution to today's mounting social, economic and environmental stresses of climate change, water scarcity, land degradation and rural poverty." The book also presents national and international policy recommendations designed to assist policy makers to implement the changes necessary to support widespread adoption of agroecology. At the ICCM4 meeting in Geneva, Sep 28- October 2, 2015, delegates can decide to take action on a request by the Africa region to formally establish a Global Alliance to Phase-out HHPs. PAN is co-organizing a side event with the global NGO network, IPEN, entitled "Closing the Gap on Highly Hazardous Pesticides (HHPs): Agroecology & the Global Alliance to Phase-out HHPs." The book, Replacing Chemicals with Biology, will be released at this event, as it provides concrete guidance to government delegates which also support the Africa region's proposal for action. Notes for Editors: Numerous high level studies, including those by the International Assessment of Agricultural Knowledge, Science and Technology for Development (IAASTD) and the UN Special Rapporteur on the right to food have concluded that the greatest scope for improving food production and food security lies in small-scale, ecologically-based diversified production systems, especially in developing countries. “If we do persist with business as usual, the world’s people cannot be fed over the next half-century. It will mean more environmental degradation, and the gap between the haves and have-nots will expand. We have an opportunity now to marshal our intellectual resources to avoid that sort of future. Otherwise we face a world nobody would want to inhabit.” - Professor Robert T. Watson, Director of the IAASTD “… scaling up agroecological practices can simultaneously increase farm productivity and food security, improve incomes and rural livelihoods, and reverse the trend towards species loss and genetic erosion.” - Olivier de Schutter, UN Special Rapporteur on the right to food, 2011 About the book                                               Download Replacing Chemicals with Biology: Phasing out Highly Hazardous Pesticides with Agroecology” provides powerful evidence from The current model of industrial agriculture is a dead end every region of the world of improved yields, greater profitability for farmers, improved health, improved food security and sovereignty, greater resilience to adverse climate events, better opportunities for women farmers, improved biodiversity and social benefits such as better cooperation between farmers and within communities. For example, farmers practicing Community Managed Sustainable Agriculture in India find that their costs have been slashed by a third whilst yields have been maintained. There are seven core principles of agroecology which aim to develop and maintain an agroecosystem that works with nature, not against it – creating a balance that keeps pests in check. Adverse effects of highly hazardous pesticides (HHPs) on people and the environment have been a global concern for many years. In 2006, this was clearly expressed by the FAO Council when it recommended a progressive ban on HHPs. The concern crystallized at UNEP’s Fourth International Conference on Chemicals Management (ICCM4) in Nairobi in 2012, with the submission of a conference room paper supported by at least 65 countries and organizations. The proposed resolution included supporting “a progressive ban on HHPs and their substitution with safer alternatives”. While the resolution was not immediately adopted, countries participating in subsequent regional meetings of the Strategic Approach to International Chemicals Management (SAICM) have reiterated concern about HHPs and called for more information on ecosystem-based alternatives. At SAICM’s Open-Ended Working Group in December 2014, following a call by the entire African region for a global alliance to phase-out these chemicals, it was agreed a proposal would be developed for ICCM4. Pesticides, designed to kill living organisms and deliberately released into the environment, now contaminate all parts of the world – soil, water, air, fog, snow, ice, the bark of trees, the Arctic, grasses high in the Himalayas and wildlife everywhere. They also contaminate people across the globe, and ordinary everyday exposures through use, drift and residues in food and water have resulted in a huge human toll including acute effects, chronic health problems and deaths. Recent field surveys show that a very high proportion of farmers and agricultural workers exposed to pesticides through their work are suffering acute health effects: in Pakistan, 100 percent of women picking cotton after pesticides were sprayed, in Bangladesh 85 percent of applicators, in Burkina Faso 82 percent of farmers and in Brazil 45 percent of agricultural workers surveyed. Agricultural production also suffers from loss of pollinators and the beneficial insects that provide natural control of pests. The purpose of this publication is to provide information drawn from all regions to assist countries in replacing HHPs with ecosystem-based approaches to pest and crop management – replacing chemicals with biology. It draws together previously published and new material in a form that is accessible for policy- and decision-makers at the national and international level, as well as providing practical guidance at the farm and farm-support level. It also points out that use, and phasing out, of HHPs must be seen in the context not only of human health and environmental impacts and costs, but also in the context of food security, poverty reduction, and climate change.       Recent Posts Farming Community in Yavatmal came up with a Declaration to stop pesticide Menace on the World Soil Day and No Pesticide Use Week December 7, 2018 Draft Pesticide Management Bill-2017 not comprehensive enough to address issues on pesticides in India March 15, 2018 END CORPORATE GREED! RIGHTS NOW! December 3, 2017 Untold Realities of Pesticide Poisonings in Yavatmal District in Maharashtra October 28, 2017 Chemical leak in Delhi – PAN India urge to establish pesticide free buffer zones around schools May 11, 2017 TagsAgroecology AnupamVarma Commitee Report Banned Pesticides BAN Pesticides BRS COPs 2017 Climate Change Corporate Accountability Corporate Libility Delhi gas leack Draft Banning of Pesticides Order 2016 Fact Finding Mission Food Sovereignty Glyphosate Herbicide HHP HHPs Indian Tea India Pesticide Ban India Pesticide Risk Inhalational Poisonings Maharashtra Association of Pesticide Poisonned Persons No pesticide Use Day Paraquat Paraquat Retailing India Paraquat Use is India Pesticide Management Bill-2017 Pesticide Poisoning in Yavatmal Pesticide Regulation Phasing out HHPs Plantation Pesticide PMB-2017 Roundup Tea Plantations UN HRC Special Rapporteur on the right to food World Soil Day Yavatmal Declaration Yavatmal poisoning


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