• New report reveals shocking reality of paraquat dichloride retailing on India

    New report reveals shocking reality of paraquat dichloride retailing on India Press Release | 8th April 2017 This report presents kind of practices being pursued in selling paraquat dichloride, a toxic chemical, in India. Data collected from the State of West Bengal shows that practices are casual and basic, violating Indian national laws as well as the International Code of Conduct on Pesticides Management. This study has noted a range of issues with regard to the retailing of paraquat dichloride in West Bengal. It ranges from selling products not authorised by the manufacturers, absence of mandatory labelling on certain products, recommendations for the use of paraquat on crops not included in the CIB&RC directive, inadequate information on PPE on the label, PPE not given or sold at the retail points and farmers not advised of its requirement, to decanting and selling in refill or empty bottles and plastic carry bags, without labels or instruction leaflets. Additionally, label information is not provided in the local language and there were wide variations in the cost of various brands, raising concerns about quality. Retail sale of paraquat and related practices noted in West Bengal are in violation of the Indian Insecticides Act and Rules as well as the International Code of Conduct on Pesticides Management. Central Insecticides Board and Registration Committee, the Central and State Agriculture Departments, manufacturers and retailers are responsible for enforcement of rules. However, these violations indicate lack of stringent regulation as well as monitoring and gross failure of the current regulatory mechanisms. Illegal practices illustrated in the report reveal gross failure of the Indian pesticide regulatory system to rein in sellers and buyers. In a scenario of lax regulatory system and totally ignorant users, this report recommends immediate ban on the production, import, sale and use of paraquat dichloride in India, and adoption of non-chemical methods of weed management and agro-ecology. Click to get the report               Recent Posts Draft Pesticide Management Bill-2017 not comprehensive enough to address issues on pesticides in India March 15, 2018 END CORPORATE GREED! RIGHTS NOW! December 3, 2017 Untold Realities of Pesticide Poisonings in Yavatmal District in Maharashtra October 28, 2017 Chemical leak in Delhi – PAN India urge to establish pesticide free buffer zones around schools May 11, 2017 PAN Welcomes Listing of Pesticides under the Rotterdam Convention May 6, 2017 TagsAgroecology AnupamVarma Commitee Report Banned Pesticides BAN Pesticides BRS COPs 2017 Climate Change Corporate Accountability Delhi gas leack Draft Banning of Pesticides Order 2016 Fact Finding Mission Food Sovereignty Glyphosate Herbicide HHP HHPs Indian Tea India Pesticide Ban India Pesticide Risk Inhalational Poisonings Paraquat Paraquat Retailing India Paraquat Use is India Pesticide Management Bill-2017 Pesticide Regulation Phasing out HHPs Plantation Pesticide PMB-2017 Roundup Tea Plantations UN HRC Special Rapporteur on the right to food Yavatmal poisoning


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  • Paraquat in India: too big a risk for farmers and workers

    Paraquat in India: too big a risk for farmers and workers Press Release by PAN India, IUF, PAN Asia and the Pacific, Berne Declaration Geneva, Penang, Thiruvananthapuram, Hyderabad, Zürich |  April 23, 2015   A new report published today Conditions of Paraquat use in India  shows that the herbicide paraquat is widely used under high–risk conditions in India. The report finds that rules and recommendations for paraquat use are often ignored, that users don’t have the required information, nor do they have the means to protect themselves from exposure. All of this violates the International Code of Conduct on Pesticide Management.   The victims are farmers and workers who are suffering from numerous adverse health effects caused by paraquat. The report’s publishers are therefore calling for paraquat to be included on a list (under the Rotterdam Convention) which allows governments much more control over its importation. Such a listing, say the publishers, would support developing countries to make an informed decision on allowing or not the importation of paraquat.   “Conditions of Paraquat Use in India” published by the IUF, Pesticide Action Network (PAN)Asia and the Pacific, PAN India and the Berne Declaration, shows the shocking reality about the use of paraquat in India. This highly hazardous herbicide is already banned in many countries around the world, including African and Asian countries, the European Union, and Switzerland, the home country of Syngenta, the main producer of paraquat. Nevertheless, it is still one of the world’s most widely used herbicides, especially in developing countries, where its use leads to the poisoning of countless workers and farmers.   The data, collected across six states in India, revealed that: • paraquat is sold in plastic carrying bags  • even when it is sold in proper containers, many users can’t read the labels • contrary to recommended use instructions, users mix it with other ingredients  • users apply it with leaking knapsack sprayers and use it on crops that the herbicide is not approved for  • personal protective equipment is nearly non-existent    These practices increase exposure and the risk to human health. As a result, farmers and workers suffer from headaches, vomiting, burning sensations, breathing difficulty, muscle pain and/or abdominal discomfort. Chronic exposure can lead to lung, brain or skin damage.   Paraquat is being used on about 25 crops (in the study area) while the Central Insecticide Board & Registration Committee (CIBRC) of India has approved its use on only nine crops. Furthermore, manufacturers of paraquat (including the main manufacturer Syngenta) have recommended its use on crops not approved by the CIBRC; this is in violation of the Indian Insecticides Act. The study also shows that the use of paraquat in India violates the International Code of Conduct on Pesticide Management; and under the Code manufacturers, distributors and relevant authorities have a duty to change this untenable situation.   From May 12-14, the delegates of the 154 parties to the Rotterdam Convention will meet in Geneva to vote on a proposal to list the most common paraquat formulation in Annex III of the Convention. The result of this study underlines the urgent need for such a listing, which will first of all facilitate information exchange about its characteristics, and help countries to make an informed decision about its importation. We call on all parties to support the listing, to give countries the possibility to act in a responsible manner, and to protect human health.   click to get the report   For more information:   C. Jayakumar, PAN India: Tel: +91 944 7016587; Email: jayakumar.c@gmail.com Dr. Narasimha Reddy Tel: +919010205742; Email: nreddy.donthi@gmail.com   Sue Longley, IUF: Tel: +41 22 793 2233; Email: sue.longley@iuf.org  Sarojeni Rengam, PAN AP: Tel:+604 657 0271; Email: sarojeni.rengam@panap.net  François Meienberg, Berne Declaration: Tel: +41 44 277 70 04; Email: food@evb.ch             Recent Posts Draft Pesticide Management Bill-2017 not comprehensive enough to address issues on pesticides in India March 15, 2018 END CORPORATE GREED! RIGHTS NOW! December 3, 2017 Untold Realities of Pesticide Poisonings in Yavatmal District in Maharashtra October 28, 2017 Chemical leak in Delhi – PAN India urge to establish pesticide free buffer zones around schools May 11, 2017 PAN Welcomes Listing of Pesticides under the Rotterdam Convention May 6, 2017 TagsAgroecology AnupamVarma Commitee Report Banned Pesticides BAN Pesticides BRS COPs 2017 Climate Change Corporate Accountability Delhi gas leack Draft Banning of Pesticides Order 2016 Fact Finding Mission Food Sovereignty Glyphosate Herbicide HHP HHPs Indian Tea India Pesticide Ban India Pesticide Risk Inhalational Poisonings Paraquat Paraquat Retailing India Paraquat Use is India Pesticide Management Bill-2017 Pesticide Regulation Phasing out HHPs Plantation Pesticide PMB-2017 Roundup Tea Plantations UN HRC Special Rapporteur on the right to food Yavatmal poisoning


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