• Indian government urged to push through with total ban of 27 pesticides Press Release | 27th June 2020 Photo: Dileep Kumar, PAN IndiaWhile appreciating the effort of Indian government to ban 27 pesticides, PAN feels that the recent developments show that the ban is in the process of being watered down, or worse, withdrawn completely with no other reason other than the profit motive of the chemical industry.  Allowing the manufacture and export of these pesticides reinforces “double standards” in pesticides trade, wherein countries are allowed to export pesticides that are already banned in their home countries. It’s a dirty practice that India, as a responsible member of the global community, must not replicate, keeping in mind global environmental health and well-being. Pesticide Action Network (PAN) Asia Pacific and PAN India strongly urges the Indian government to push through with its initial recommendation of a total ban on 27 toxic pesticides and prioritise people’s health and the environment over chemical industry profits. The two advocacy groups issued this joint statement after the Indian Ministry of Agriculture and Farmers Welfare, responding to industry groups, amended an 18thMay draft order for a total ban on 27 pesticides. In the 10thJune revised order, government will now allow the manufacture of these pesticides for export purposes. It also extended the period for comments by stakeholders from 45 to 90 days, with an official even quoted in a news report as saying that the government may review the ban “if industry furnishes documents proving that these chemicals are safe for environment.” “We laud the Indian government for taking this much-awaited decisive step to ban these 27 pesticides, many of which are already banned in other countries. However, recent developments show that the ban is in the process of being watered down, or worse, withdrawn completely with no other reason other than the profit motive of the chemical industry. If allowed to happen, it will put to waste many years of independent study by its own expert panel and derail ongoing efforts to promote safer alternatives—something that should actually be a priority given the current health crisis,” said Sarojeni Rengam, PANAP executive director. Rengam stressed that allowing the manufacture and export of these pesticides reinforces “double standards” in pesticides trade, wherein countries are allowed to export pesticides that are already banned in their home countries. “Developed countries have been allowed to manufacture and export pesticides that they have already banned, revealing an unjust double standard that keeps the cycle of poison going. It’s a dirty practice that India, as a responsible member of the global community, must not replicate, keeping in mind global environmental health and well-being,” she said. The group noted that Indian pesticide exports go to countries like Bangladesh and Sri Lanka where PANAP have also monitored high cases of pesticide poisoning. Twenty of the 27 pesticides are part of PAN International’s list of Highly Hazardous Pesticides (HHPs), or pesticides with proven high acute toxicity, long-term health effects, and hazards to ecosystems. The ministry’s ban order itself states that these pesticides are carcinogenic, neurotoxic, disruptive to the hormonal system, and linked to reproductive and developmental disorders. They are also highly toxic to bees, aquatic organisms and birds. PAN India pointed out that some of these pesticides are already covered by state-level bans. “Two of these pesticides (monocrotophos, acephate) are already banned in the state of Maharashtra after being implicated in the high incidence of poisoning in cotton farming communities. The Punjab state government did not issue fresh licenses to five of the 27 pesticides (2,4-D, benfuracarb, dicofol, methomyl, monocrotophos) due to their harmful effects. In Kerala, some of these pesticides (monocrotophos, carbofuran, atrazine) have been banned since 2011 due to public health concerns. Evidence on the ground is clear: our farmers should no longer be using these pesticides,” said Dileep Kumar, PAN India assistant director. Additionally, 6 of the 27 pesticides (atrazine, carbofuran, chlorpyrifos, malathion, mancozeb, monocrotophos) are on PANAP’s list of Twenty Pesticides that are Toxic to Children, whose effects include birth defects, brain damage and reduced IQs. Monocrotophos, in particular, is responsible for the Bihar tragedy in 2013, wherein 23 schoolchildren died after eating food contaminated by the pesticide. Analysis by PAN India shows that there are currently 282 pesticides registered for use in India. “These 27 pesticides forms less than 10 percent of all registered pesticides. Hence, banning them would not impact food security and agriculture production, and even the assessment of the government found that alternatives are available to all of them. Several pesticides are also usually used for a single crop pest combination, so banning some of them would not affect crop health management but would definitely contribute to reducing the toxic burden of communities as well as Indian consumers,” Kumar added. Jayakumar Chelaton, PAN India director, added that many of the pesticides proposed for ban are implicated in both occupational and self-poisonings in India. “Banning these pesticides is expected to bring down poisoning incidences and ensure a safer working farm environment in the country. PAN India is happy to support the government in eliminating toxic pesticides and assist in replacing these with agroecological farming practices.” PAN India urges the Ministry of Agriculture to review all the remaining pesticides that are registered for use in the country with the same criteria used for assessing the 27 pesticides, and come up with stringent actions for protecting human health and the environment. It also calls on the government to amend the proposed Pest Management Bill 2020, as the current version has several deficiencies concerning pesticides registration, protection of workers and end users, and business and promotion practices. “The international community is vigilantly watching to see whether the Indian government will uphold public interest or cave in to industry pressure with the 27 pesticides ban. We have high hopes that it will stand by the findings of its expert panel and that it will base its final decision on independent, global, and scientific evidence and concrete experiences of farmers, not the self-serving and profit-motivated statements by the chemical industry,” said Dr. Narasimha Reddy, PAN India consultant. -------------------- Pesticide Action Network (PAN) is a network of over 600 participating non-governmental organizations, institutions and individuals in over 90 countries working to replace the use of hazardous pesticides with ecologically sound and socially just alternatives. PAN Asia Pacific (PANAP) is a PAN regional center based in Penang, Malaysia. PAN India is a national non-profit organisation based in Kerala, India. For reference: PAN Asia Pacific- Ms. Sarojeni Rengam, executive director: sarojeni.rengam@panap.net PAN India- A. D. Dileep Kumar, Ph. 09447340748; Dr. Narasimha Reddy Donthi, Ph. 09010205742; Jayakumar Chelaton Ph. 09447016587 Recent Posts भारत सरकार ने 27 कीटनाशकों पर पूर्ण प्रतिबंध लगाने का आग्रह किया കീടനാശിനികൾ നിരോധിക്കാനുള്ള തീരുമാനവുമായി കേന്ദ്രസർക്കാർ ശക്തമായി മുന്നോട്ട് പോകണം Indian government urged to push through with total ban of 27 pesticides Government Proposes Banning of 27 Pesticides Used in India Which are Banned In Other Countries Central Insecticide Board clarifies pesticide spraying with drone illegal in India TagsAgroecology AnupamVarma Commitee Report Banned Pesticides BAN Pesticides BRS COPs 2017 Climate Change Community Suffering Corporate Accountability Corporate Libility Delhi gas leack Draft Banning of Pesticides Order 2016 Fact Finding Mission Food Sovereignty Glyphosate Glyphosate ban Herbicide HHP HHPs Highly Hazardous Pesticides Indian Tea India Pesticide Ban India Pesticide Risk Inhalational Poisonings Maharashtra Association of Pesticide Poisonned Persons MAPPP Non-chemical Alternatives No pesticide Use Day Paraquat Paraquat Retailing India Paraquat Use is India Pesticide Management Bill-2017 Pesticide Menace in Yavatma Pesticide Poisoning Pesticide Poisoning in Yavatmal Pesticide Regulation Phasing out HHPs Plantation Pesticide PMB-2017 Roundup Tea Plantations UN HRC Special Rapporteur on the right to food World Soil Day Yavatmal Yavatmal Declaration Yavatmal poisoning


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  • Government of India Moves to Ban 27 Pesticides Used in the Country that are Already Banned Abroad Press Release | 20th May 2020 PAN India welcomes the proposal of Government of India to ban the 27 pesticides, and urges the Agriculture Ministry to review all the remaining pesticides registered in India with the same criteria used for assessing the 27 chemicals and come up with stringent regulatory measures. In an appreciable move, Government of India is considering banning of 27 highly toxic pesticides, which are currently used in India, but are already banned in one or more countries. In a gazette notification issued on 14thof May 2020, the Ministry of Agriculture proposed a draft order intended to ban the 27 pesticides and sought comments or suggestions from stakeholders. The notification says ‘sixty-six insecticides which are banned or restricted or withdrawn in other countries but continue to be registered for domestic use in India’ were reviewed by an Expert Committee set up by the Ministry of Agriculture. The ministry considered recommendations of this committee and recognized that use of the ‘twenty seven insecticides are likely to involve risk to human being and animals as to render it expedient or necessary to take immediate action’. The draft order has a list of 27 pesticides with decision of the government for each of them. Many of them are highly hazardous pesticides with potential to cause severe health effects such as hormonal changes, neurotoxic effects, reproductive and developmental health effects, carcinogenic effects, as well as environmental impacts such as toxic to bees. Many of them reported to have data deficient for regulatory purposes and noted that alternatives are available for all of them.  The following are the list of pesticides proposed to be banned which include insecticides, fungicides and weedicides: 2,4-D, acephate, atrazine, benfuracarb, butachlor, captan, carbendazin, carbofuran, chlorpyriphos, deltamethrin, dicofol, dimethoate, dinocap, diuron, malathion, mancozeb, methimyl, monocrotophos, oxyfluorfen, pendimethalin, quninalphos, sulfosulfuron, thiodicarb, thiophante methyl, thiram, zineb and ziram. Many of them are extremely and highly toxic pesticides. Some of them are already addressed by State level regulations/bans in India. Monocrotophos was banned briefly by Adilabad District Collector and Ooty District Collector due to rampant illegal use and toxicity potential on food, environment and farmers in 2019. In 2018, Punjab Agriculture Department had sought to review licenses and not to issue fresh licenses for five (2,4-D. benfuracarb, dicofl, methomyl and monocrotophos) of the 27 pesticides because of harmful effects on human beings and environmental sustainability and economic viability.  Maharashtra government prohibited two of them (monocrotohos and acephate) in 2017 as they were implicated in the high incidence of pesticides poisonings among cotton farming community. The State of Kerala already banned some of these pesticides such as monocrotophos, carbofuran, atrazine, etc. back in 2011 on the grounds of public health concerns.. Responding to the draft notification, Jayakumar Chelaton, Director of Pesticide Action Network (PAN) India noted that ‘this is a hopeful move by the Indian government for protecting public health and environmental well being’.  He added that ‘many of the pesticides proposed for ban are implicated in both occupational and self-poisonings in India. Banning them is expected to bring down poisoning incidences and ensuring a safe working farm environment in the country. PAN India is happy to support government of India for eliminating toxic pesticides by replacing them with agroecological farming practice. Dr. Narasimha Reddy, a policy expert and Consultant to PAN India stressed that, ‘the decision of Government of India to ban those pesticides used in the country, which are already banned in other countries is a much-awaited one. Banning of these pesticides would bring down toxic burden of farming community as well as consumers in India. However, more stringent regulations and bans are inevitable in India as we have more than 280 pesticides currently registered for use. Moreover, for safeguarding farming community and general public in the country, the proposed Pest Management Bill 2020 has to be amended appropriately as the current version introduced in the Rajya Sabha has several lacunae concerning pesticide registration, worker protection, end users of pesticides and immunity to pesticide business and promotion. Dileep Kumar, Assistant Director of PAN India said that, ‘15 of the 27 pesticides that are proposed to be banned now are considered ‘deemed to be registered pesticides’ in the country owing to data lacunae since several years’. He added ‘several pesticides registered for use in India are highly hazardous which are capable of causing severe short term and long term health consequences to the users and environment. Hence, PAN India urges the Ministry of Agriculture to review all the remaining pesticides that are registered for use in the country with the same criteria used for assessing the 27 chemicals and come up with stringent actions for protecting human health and environment’. Analysis by PAN India shows that, currently 289 pesticides registered for use in India and this 27 pesticides forms less than 10 percent of them. Hence banning these 27 pesticides would not impact food security and agriculture production in the country as the assessment of the government found that alternatives are available to all of them.  As several pesticides are registered and approved for use in India for a single crop pest combination, banning some of them would not affect crop health management but would definitely contribute to reducing toxic burden of communities. Hence PAN India strongly recommends the Agriculture Ministry to ban all these 27 pesticides without delay. Download PAN India's Response here   Recent Posts भारत सरकार ने 27 कीटनाशकों पर पूर्ण प्रतिबंध लगाने का आग्रह किया കീടനാശിനികൾ നിരോധിക്കാനുള്ള തീരുമാനവുമായി കേന്ദ്രസർക്കാർ ശക്തമായി മുന്നോട്ട് പോകണം Indian government urged to push through with total ban of 27 pesticides Government Proposes Banning of 27 Pesticides Used in India Which are Banned In Other Countries Central Insecticide Board clarifies pesticide spraying with drone illegal in India TagsAgroecology AnupamVarma Commitee Report Banned Pesticides BAN Pesticides BRS COPs 2017 Climate Change Community Suffering Corporate Accountability Corporate Libility Delhi gas leack Draft Banning of Pesticides Order 2016 Fact Finding Mission Food Sovereignty Glyphosate Glyphosate ban Herbicide HHP HHPs Highly Hazardous Pesticides Indian Tea India Pesticide Ban India Pesticide Risk Inhalational Poisonings Maharashtra Association of Pesticide Poisonned Persons MAPPP Non-chemical Alternatives No pesticide Use Day Paraquat Paraquat Retailing India Paraquat Use is India Pesticide Management Bill-2017 Pesticide Menace in Yavatma Pesticide Poisoning Pesticide Poisoning in Yavatmal Pesticide Regulation Phasing out HHPs Plantation Pesticide PMB-2017 Roundup Tea Plantations UN HRC Special Rapporteur on the right to food World Soil Day Yavatmal Yavatmal Declaration Yavatmal poisoning


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  • Chemical leak in Delhi - PAN India urge to establish pesticide free buffer zones around schools Press Release | 10th May, 2017 Toxic chemical leak in Delhi had left children breathless and in agony Chemical leak near two schools in New Delhi reminds us of the urgent need to create chemical-free buffer zones around education institutions. This chemical leak incident that happened very close to two schools in the Tughlakabad area in Delhi, in the morning of 6th May 2017, had left children breathless and in agony. According to reports, school going children inhaled a toxic chemical 2-Chloro-5-chloromethylpyridine, leaking from a truck parked in a container depot located near two schools in southeast Delhi’s Tughlaqabad area. More than 400 girls were immediately impacted and were hospitalised. Students of Government Girls Senior Secondary School (GGSSS) and  Rani Jhansi School were taken to nearby hospitals as they complained of severe eye irritation and breathlessness. According to news reports, students complained of vomiting, coughing, and feeling uneasy and eye irritation.   School students under treatment in a hospital, Delhi. Source: PTI Photo As reported, at least 487 school students and teachers and residents of a colony in Tughlaqabad fell sick on Saturday after inhaling fumes emanating from a liquid (2-Chloro-5-chloromethylpyridine). The National Disaster Response Force had reported that the truck contained 80 cans of  2-Chloro-5-chloromethylpyridine. The truck was parked in the Tughlaqabad depot waiting customs clearance. Reports say the chemical container was imported from China and was to be taken to Sonepat in Haryana. Chemical leaked in Delhi is used for manufacture of insecticides and pesticides 2-Chloro-5-chloromethylpyridine is used in the production of an insecticide imidacloroprid, which has been found to be extremely toxic to non-target insects and bees. According to Pubchem, an open chemistry database of US National Library of Medicine, 2-Chloro-5-chloromethylpyridine is a dangerous chemical having the potential to cause severe skin burns and eye damage. Apparently, some quick action from school authorities, and NDRF, has contained the situation, and has saved children from serious impacts. However, medical parameters of the affected children need to be monitored for a longer period, to rule out chronic impacts. Incidentally, this happened in the heart of the Indian capital. One can only imagine what if the same leak happened near rural schools, or locations, which are far away from hospitals and rapid action teams. Is India ready to protect its children from chemical accidents, incidents and neglect of safety by the transporters, storage operators and chemical or pesticide users? India did not learn much from the Bhopal disaster in 1984. Apart from the discussion whether the Delhi gas leak is a unfortunate incident or an accident, school going children are exposed to similar hazards on a daily basis in most rural areas across India, as pesticide sprays, often more dangerous than 2-Chloro-5-chloromethylpyridine. Children in schools located near agricultural fields, and plantations, inhale drift from pesticide sprays. Scientific research has established long back that children whose breath is faster than adults are likely to be impacted more severely. Children impacted by toxic chemicals is an indication of negligence and failure of regulatory regime Pesticide Action Network (PAN) India director C. Jayakumar said, “it is so sad that children had become victims of hazardous substances which are inputs in the manufacture of agrochemicals. Even after several incidents right from the Bhopal gas tragedy, our authorities have not  realized the seriousness of the problem and are not taking measures to keep away hazardous chemicals from the vicinity of even education institutions in view of  public health and safety”. Adding further, he said, “in India, we have successfully established tobacco and alcohol free zones around schools but failed to bring in such restrictions for more dangerous substances such as chemicals and pesticides.” Pesticides free buffer zones around education institutions needed Dr. Narasimha Reddy Donthi of PAN India pointed to the urgent need of establishing buffer-zones of at least a kilometre around education institutions and child care centres. Hazardous chemicals, pesticides and or raw materials used to produce such dangerous chemicals should not be stored, manufactured or used in any form near this safe zone. Dileep Kumar A. D., Programme Coordinator of PAN India, said “carelessness of manufacturers, importers, transporters and users of hazardous chemicals and pesticides, and inaction of concerned authorities today compromises the safety of children. The future of nation is in the hands of children and therefore they should get a toxic free life and poison free environment to grow”. PAN India urges the Central and State Governments to come up with stringent measures to keep away hazardous chemicals and pesticides from the vicinity of education institutions, to ensure safety of children. Considering public health and safety, authorities must come up with policies towards the establishment of pesticide-free buffer zones at least around schools while efforts should be taken to phase out production and use of agrochemicals. Take action - Support call for pesticide free buffer zones around schools Learn more about Protect Our Children from Toxic Pesticides campaign               Protect Our Children From Toxic Pesticides Support our call for pesticide-free buffer zones around schools.               Recent Posts भारत सरकार ने 27 कीटनाशकों पर पूर्ण प्रतिबंध लगाने का आग्रह किया കീടനാശിനികൾ നിരോധിക്കാനുള്ള തീരുമാനവുമായി കേന്ദ്രസർക്കാർ ശക്തമായി മുന്നോട്ട് പോകണം Indian government urged to push through with total ban of 27 pesticides Government Proposes Banning of 27 Pesticides Used in India Which are Banned In Other Countries Central Insecticide Board clarifies pesticide spraying with drone illegal in India TagsAgroecology AnupamVarma Commitee Report Banned Pesticides BAN Pesticides BRS COPs 2017 Climate Change Community Suffering Corporate Accountability Corporate Libility Delhi gas leack Draft Banning of Pesticides Order 2016 Fact Finding Mission Food Sovereignty Glyphosate Glyphosate ban Herbicide HHP HHPs Highly Hazardous Pesticides Indian Tea India Pesticide Ban India Pesticide Risk Inhalational Poisonings Maharashtra Association of Pesticide Poisonned Persons MAPPP Non-chemical Alternatives No pesticide Use Day Paraquat Paraquat Retailing India Paraquat Use is India Pesticide Management Bill-2017 Pesticide Menace in Yavatma Pesticide Poisoning Pesticide Poisoning in Yavatmal Pesticide Regulation Phasing out HHPs Plantation Pesticide PMB-2017 Roundup Tea Plantations UN HRC Special Rapporteur on the right to food World Soil Day Yavatmal Yavatmal Declaration Yavatmal poisoning


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  • The decision to ban 18 pesticides in India brings hope, but it should be extended to include all the pesticides banned/restricted elsewhere and still used in India Press Release | 10th January 2017 Pesticide Action Network (PAN) India welcomes the decision by Department of Agriculture, Cooperation and Farmers Welfare, Government of India, to ban manufacture, import, formulate, transport, sell and use of 18 of the 66 pesticides which are still registered for domestic use in India but banned or restricted in one or more other countries due to health and environmental concern. The decision to ban the 18 pesticides came following the ban recommendation given in the report submitted by the expert review committee constituted under the chairmanship of Dr. Anupam Varma and by considering the observation from Registration committee of the Central Insecticide board and Registration committee. The Anupam Varma committee was constituted in 2013 to review the use of neonicotinoid pesticides in India, but in the same year the mandate of the expert committee was extended to include the 66 pesticides banned or restricted in other countries but continued to be registered for use in India. The expert committee submitted its review report by the end of 2015. The Central Government, after considering the recommendations of the said Expert Committee and after consultation with the Registration Committee satisfied that the use of 18 pesticides are likely to involve risk to human beings and animals as to render it expedient or necessary to take immediate action. Though it is considered as a good move from the central agriculture department to ban the 18 pesticides, exclusion of the remaining 48 pesticides, in the list of 66 pesticides is need to be relooked urgently. PAN India director C. Jayakumar, while responding to the notification on draft Banning of Pesticides Order, 2016 issued by Ministry of agriculture on 15thDecember 2016 [Notification S.O.4212 (E) dated 15thDecember 2016 (F.No.13035/31/2013-PP-I)], says ‘it is unfair and a failure of governance that Indian government allows the use of hazardous pesticides that are either banned or restricted in other countries over health and environmental impacts’. He pointed that while the decision to ban 18 of the 66 pesticides is an appreciable move from the government, allowing the use of remaining 48 pesticides cannot be justified as there is more than enough information available on their hazardous nature and harms it can cause to people and the country. It may be because of the pressure from the industry that the government is unable to take a decision to ban the entire 66 pesticides. ‘In effect, the government is actually promoting the use of such hazardous pesticides and thereby continuing to put farming communities and consumers in India to innumerable health and environmental risks’, he added. Mr. Jayakumar also pointed out that it is unfortunate that the list of 18 pesticides does not include paraquat dichloride, a highly hazardous herbicide already banned in the South Indian State of Kerala; and is used in remaining part of India. Paraquat is a candidate for the Prior Informed Consent (PIC) list of Rotterdam Convention. The use of paraquat is banned or disallowed in at least 32 countries including members of European Union due to its adverse health effects. In Switzerland, the home country of Syngenta, the main producer of paraquat, it is banned since 1989 due to its high acute toxicity for humans. Dr Narasimha Reddy of PAN India says government should release the report submitted by the AnupamVarma Committee for public scrutiny. Glyphosate, a widely used herbicide is not there in the list of 18 pesticides; the World Health organisation recently classified it as a carcinogenic chemical. Dr. Reddy stressed that the government should come up and show its commitment to the people of India by immediately banning all the pesticides that are already banned or restricted in other countries and continue to register in India and safeguard communities from the hazardous effects of such pesticides. Also the government should initiate a process to review all other pesticides registered for use in India for its health and environmental toxicity and come up with firm actions to protect human health and environment. Attachments: minutes of 361st special meeting of registration committee - 22nd December 2015 pesticide banning order - 2016 notification     Recent Posts भारत सरकार ने 27 कीटनाशकों पर पूर्ण प्रतिबंध लगाने का आग्रह किया കീടനാശിനികൾ നിരോധിക്കാനുള്ള തീരുമാനവുമായി കേന്ദ്രസർക്കാർ ശക്തമായി മുന്നോട്ട് പോകണം Indian government urged to push through with total ban of 27 pesticides Government Proposes Banning of 27 Pesticides Used in India Which are Banned In Other Countries Central Insecticide Board clarifies pesticide spraying with drone illegal in India TagsAgroecology AnupamVarma Commitee Report Banned Pesticides BAN Pesticides BRS COPs 2017 Climate Change Community Suffering Corporate Accountability Corporate Libility Delhi gas leack Draft Banning of Pesticides Order 2016 Fact Finding Mission Food Sovereignty Glyphosate Glyphosate ban Herbicide HHP HHPs Highly Hazardous Pesticides Indian Tea India Pesticide Ban India Pesticide Risk Inhalational Poisonings Maharashtra Association of Pesticide Poisonned Persons MAPPP Non-chemical Alternatives No pesticide Use Day Paraquat Paraquat Retailing India Paraquat Use is India Pesticide Management Bill-2017 Pesticide Menace in Yavatma Pesticide Poisoning Pesticide Poisoning in Yavatmal Pesticide Regulation Phasing out HHPs Plantation Pesticide PMB-2017 Roundup Tea Plantations UN HRC Special Rapporteur on the right to food World Soil Day Yavatmal Yavatmal Declaration Yavatmal poisoning


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