• Chemical leak in Delhi – PAN India urge to establish pesticide free buffer zones around schools

    Chemical leak in Delhi - PAN India urge to establish pesticide free buffer zones around schools Press Release | 10th May, 2017 Toxic chemical leak in Delhi had left children breathless and in agony Chemical leak near two schools in New Delhi reminds us of the urgent need to create chemical-free buffer zones around education institutions. This chemical leak incident that happened very close to two schools in the Tughlakabad area in Delhi, in the morning of 6th May 2017, had left children breathless and in agony. According to reports, school going children inhaled a toxic chemical 2-Chloro-5-chloromethylpyridine, leaking from a truck parked in a container depot located near two schools in southeast Delhi’s Tughlaqabad area. More than 400 girls were immediately impacted and were hospitalised. Students of Government Girls Senior Secondary School (GGSSS) and  Rani Jhansi School were taken to nearby hospitals as they complained of severe eye irritation and breathlessness. According to news reports, students complained of vomiting, coughing, and feeling uneasy and eye irritation.   School students under treatment in a hospital, Delhi. Source: PTI Photo As reported, at least 487 school students and teachers and residents of a colony in Tughlaqabad fell sick on Saturday after inhaling fumes emanating from a liquid (2-Chloro-5-chloromethylpyridine). The National Disaster Response Force had reported that the truck contained 80 cans of  2-Chloro-5-chloromethylpyridine. The truck was parked in the Tughlaqabad depot waiting customs clearance. Reports say the chemical container was imported from China and was to be taken to Sonepat in Haryana. Chemical leaked in Delhi is used for manufacture of insecticides and pesticides 2-Chloro-5-chloromethylpyridine is used in the production of an insecticide imidacloroprid, which has been found to be extremely toxic to non-target insects and bees. According to Pubchem, an open chemistry database of US National Library of Medicine, 2-Chloro-5-chloromethylpyridine is a dangerous chemical having the potential to cause severe skin burns and eye damage. Apparently, some quick action from school authorities, and NDRF, has contained the situation, and has saved children from serious impacts. However, medical parameters of the affected children need to be monitored for a longer period, to rule out chronic impacts. Incidentally, this happened in the heart of the Indian capital. One can only imagine what if the same leak happened near rural schools, or locations, which are far away from hospitals and rapid action teams. Is India ready to protect its children from chemical accidents, incidents and neglect of safety by the transporters, storage operators and chemical or pesticide users? India did not learn much from the Bhopal disaster in 1984. Apart from the discussion whether the Delhi gas leak is a unfortunate incident or an accident, school going children are exposed to similar hazards on a daily basis in most rural areas across India, as pesticide sprays, often more dangerous than 2-Chloro-5-chloromethylpyridine. Children in schools located near agricultural fields, and plantations, inhale drift from pesticide sprays. Scientific research has established long back that children whose breath is faster than adults are likely to be impacted more severely. Children impacted by toxic chemicals is an indication of negligence and failure of regulatory regime Pesticide Action Network (PAN) India director C. Jayakumar said, “it is so sad that children had become victims of hazardous substances which are inputs in the manufacture of agrochemicals. Even after several incidents right from the Bhopal gas tragedy, our authorities have not  realized the seriousness of the problem and are not taking measures to keep away hazardous chemicals from the vicinity of even education institutions in view of  public health and safety”. Adding further, he said, “in India, we have successfully established tobacco and alcohol free zones around schools but failed to bring in such restrictions for more dangerous substances such as chemicals and pesticides.” Pesticides free buffer zones around education institutions needed Dr. Narasimha Reddy Donthi of PAN India pointed to the urgent need of establishing buffer-zones of at least a kilometre around education institutions and child care centres. Hazardous chemicals, pesticides and or raw materials used to produce such dangerous chemicals should not be stored, manufactured or used in any form near this safe zone. Dileep Kumar A. D., Programme Coordinator of PAN India, said “carelessness of manufacturers, importers, transporters and users of hazardous chemicals and pesticides, and inaction of concerned authorities today compromises the safety of children. The future of nation is in the hands of children and therefore they should get a toxic free life and poison free environment to grow”. PAN India urges the Central and State Governments to come up with stringent measures to keep away hazardous chemicals and pesticides from the vicinity of education institutions, to ensure safety of children. Considering public health and safety, authorities must come up with policies towards the establishment of pesticide-free buffer zones at least around schools while efforts should be taken to phase out production and use of agrochemicals. Take action - Support call for pesticide free buffer zones around schools Learn more about Protect Our Children from Toxic Pesticides campaign               Protect Our Children From Toxic Pesticides Support our call for pesticide-free buffer zones around schools.               Recent Posts Draft Pesticide Management Bill-2017 not comprehensive enough to address issues on pesticides in India END CORPORATE GREED! RIGHTS NOW! Untold Realities of Pesticide Poisonings in Yavatmal district in Maharashtra Chemical leak in Delhi – PAN India urge to establish pesticide free buffer zones around schools PAN Welcomes Listing of Pesticides under the Rotterdam Convention TagsAgroecology AnupamVarma Commitee Report Banned Pesticides BAN Pesticides BRS COPs 2017 Climate Change Corporate Accountability Delhi gas leack Draft Banning of Pesticides Order 2016 Fact Finding Mission Food Sovereignty Glyphosate Herbicide HHP HHPs Indian Tea India Pesticide Ban India Pesticide Risk Inhalational Poisonings Paraquat Paraquat Retailing India Paraquat Use is India Pesticide Management Bill-2017 Pesticide Regulation Phasing out HHPs Plantation Pesticide PMB-2017 Roundup Tea Plantations UN HRC Special Rapporteur on the right to food Yavatmal poisoning


    Continue reading
  • Consolidated List Of Banned Pesticides-Pan International

    Consolidated List Of Banned Pesticides-Pan International Press Release | PAN International | 24th May 2017 Pesticide Action Network (PAN) has frequently been asked for information on pesticides that have been banned by countries. The Consolidated List of Banned Pesticides (CL) has been developed to identify which pesticides have been banned by particular countries because there appears to be no other source for such information. Please download and read the Explanatory Note before attempting to read the spreadsheet of countries. PAN will update the spreadsheet approximately every 6 months. Every effort has been made to ensure the information contained in this CL is correct, but inevitably there will be errors, simply because for some countries there are conflicting lists of bans. If any country notices errors relating to their bans, please inform PAN at info@panap.net with the subject line Consolidated List of Bans. Additionally, PAN would welcome any information from countries not yet included in the list. Explanatory Note for the Consolidated List of Banned Pesticides (download) Consolidated List of Banned Pesticides (download)   Recent Posts Draft Pesticide Management Bill-2017 not comprehensive enough to address issues on pesticides in India END CORPORATE GREED! RIGHTS NOW! Untold Realities of Pesticide Poisonings in Yavatmal district in Maharashtra Chemical leak in Delhi – PAN India urge to establish pesticide free buffer zones around schools PAN Welcomes Listing of Pesticides under the Rotterdam Convention TagsAgroecology AnupamVarma Commitee Report Banned Pesticides BAN Pesticides BRS COPs 2017 Climate Change Corporate Accountability Delhi gas leack Draft Banning of Pesticides Order 2016 Fact Finding Mission Food Sovereignty Glyphosate Herbicide HHP HHPs Indian Tea India Pesticide Ban India Pesticide Risk Inhalational Poisonings Paraquat Paraquat Retailing India Paraquat Use is India Pesticide Management Bill-2017 Pesticide Regulation Phasing out HHPs Plantation Pesticide PMB-2017 Roundup Tea Plantations UN HRC Special Rapporteur on the right to food Yavatmal poisoning


    Continue reading
  • International Network Welcomes UN Special Rapporteur’s Call for Global Regulation of Pesticides

    International Network Welcomes UN Special Rapporteur’s Call for Global Regulation of Pesticides Press Release |7th March 2017 Geneva, Switzerland - Pesticide Action Network (PAN) International welcomes the release today of the report on the use of agricultural pesticides by the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the right to food. Special Rapporteur Hilal Elver today presented her report to the 34th session of the United National Human Rights Council. She noted the ongoing impacts of pesticides on people, the environment and human rights and the failure to hold the pesticide industry accountable for these effects and recommended that: The international community must work on a comprehensive, binding treaty to regulate hazardous pesticides throughout their life cycle, taking into account human rights principles. PAN unreservedly supports this recommendation and urges the international community to swiftly begin the process of negotiating a treaty. Such a mandatory treaty will generate policies to reduce pesticide use worldwide and develop a framework for the banning and phasing-out of highly hazardous pesticides and promoting agroecology. In 2015, the Strategic Approach to International Chemicals Management (SAICM), an international policy framework to promote chemical safety around the world, finally recognized highly hazardous pesticides as an ‘issue of concern’. SAICM recommended replacement of pesticides with sustainable, low toxic approaches to agriculture, such as agroecologically-based practices. The only global mechanism looking at comprehensive management of chemicals, SAICM is set to end by 2020 without having achieved any significant reductions in pesticide poisonings. The time is right for putting into practice the recommendation by the Special Rapporteur for a binding treaty to regulate hazardous pesticides throughout their life cycle. Sarojeni Rengam, Executive Director of PAN Asia Pacific strongly supports the idea of a new binding treaty and said “SAICM ends in 2020. The need for a binding international treaty for management of pesticides is becoming very clear and is an urgent need for moving forward the work started through SAICM. This is critically needed to protect the human right to food and also to protect vulnerable populations like children, farm workers and others from the harmful impacts of pesticides used in conventional agriculture in much of the world”. Javier Souza Coordinator of RAPAL, PAN Latin America, said “the human right to food implies not only access to food but also an adequate quality of that food. The intensive use of pesticides and fertilizers together with the use of genetically modified seeds results in a loss of food quality. PAN International demands that at the global level binding mechanisms are set up that promote agroecological methods of food production for generating sustainable, viable and resilient agroecosystems.” PAN International has worked extensively on the issue of Highly Hazardous Pesticides or HHPs in agriculture and released a new version of a list of such HHPs in December 2016. Susan Haffmans from PAN Germany said “Highly Hazardous Pesticides are a big contributor to health and environmental harms around the globe. There is no “safe use” of hazardous pesticides. For the sake of future generations the international community should act now and agree on a binding treaty to regulate and ultimately phase out hazardous pesticides and to promote agroecological alternatives. Having seen first-hand the successes of agroecology in promoting good health and a safe environment Abou Thiam, Director of PAN Africa added that “Agriculture around the world can no longer be dependent on a resource intensive, environmentally destructive paradigm that harms communities and produces lower quality food. Binding international mechanisms promoting agroecology have to be set up that protect human health and the environment and increase farm output, biodiversity and resilience.” PAN UK has worked extensively to promote agroecological practices in a number of key crops in Africa and Latin America. Keith Tyrell, Director of PAN UK said “Today there are no excuses for continuing business- as-usual when it comes to agriculture. Food and fiber are being grown successfully without the use of HHPs around the world. The Special Rapporteur’s report unmasks the forces that try to make resource intensive agriculture look like the acceptable norm. We must push forward the right to food that is cultivated safely and sustainably.” Judy Hatcher, Executive Director of PAN North America summed up by saying “The UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food highlighted the corporate control over the agricultural system around much of the globe. This corporate capture of the food system has resulted in devastation for communities around the world and led to artificial scarcity and poor quality foods. It is time to right this wrong and get a robust international mechanism in place that will truly protect our human right to food.” Pesticide Action Network, an international network with regional centers on five continents, has been working for over 35 years to bring attention to the problem of pesticide poisoning, and to spur international action to address the problem. The Special Rapporteur’s report is available at: http://www.ohchr.org/EN/Issues/Food/Pages/Annual.aspx Available for interview: Abou Thiam, PAN Africa, abouthiam@pan-afrique.org, +223 64898163 Sarojeni Rengam, PAN Asia Pacific, sarojeni.rengam@panap.net Susan Haffmans, PAN Germany, susan.haffmans@pan-germany.org , +49(0)40-3991910-25 Javier Souza Casadinho, PAN Latin America, javierrapal@yahoo.com.ar ,+11 15 3617 1782 Paul Towers, PAN North America, ptowers@panna.org , +10119165883100 Keith Tyrell, PAN United Kingdom, keithtyrell@pan-uk.org , +447588706224           Recent Posts Draft Pesticide Management Bill-2017 not comprehensive enough to address issues on pesticides in India March 15, 2018 END CORPORATE GREED! RIGHTS NOW! December 3, 2017 Untold Realities of Pesticide Poisonings in Yavatmal district in Maharashtra October 28, 2017 Chemical leak in Delhi – PAN India urge to establish pesticide free buffer zones around schools May 11, 2017 PAN Welcomes Listing of Pesticides under the Rotterdam Convention May 6, 2017 TagsAgroecology AnupamVarma Commitee Report Banned Pesticides BAN Pesticides BRS COPs 2017 Climate Change Corporate Accountability Delhi gas leack Draft Banning of Pesticides Order 2016 Fact Finding Mission Food Sovereignty Glyphosate Herbicide HHP HHPs Indian Tea India Pesticide Ban India Pesticide Risk Inhalational Poisonings Paraquat Paraquat Retailing India Paraquat Use is India Pesticide Management Bill-2017 Pesticide Regulation Phasing out HHPs Plantation Pesticide PMB-2017 Roundup Tea Plantations UN HRC Special Rapporteur on the right to food Yavatmal poisoning


    Continue reading